How Can Districts Successfully Implement a SEL Strategy for English Language Learners?

Schools that respect diversity can help protect children against bullying. However, English Language Learners (ELL’s) may experience high anxiety and low self-confidence because they do not feel like a part of the community. These feelings can make it extremely difficult for students to acquire another language. Considering that, when children perceived as different, they may be at a higher risk of being bullied.

Continue reading

4 Counseling Activities to Promote SEL

Our emotions and relationships affect what we learn and how we put our learnings to practice in our various environments: work, family, and community contexts. Emotions can enable us to generate an active interest in learning and sustain our engagement in it. Additionally, unmanaged stress and poor regulation of impulses interfere with attention and memory and contribute to behaviors disruptive to learning.

Continue reading

5 guiding principles for head administrators to implement SEL in their school

SEL instruction takes place every day, in every school setting. With all that must be accomplished in a school day, how can administrators and school staff also make time for socioemotional skills? McGraw Hill Education published “Building Social and Emotional Learning into the School Day: Five Guiding Principles”, a guide to support all stakeholders in the important work of building SEL into the academic day, at every grade level and in every setting.

Continue reading

Supporting English Language Learners with SEL

According to the study “Principles and Practice in Second Language Acquisition”, high anxiety and low self-confidence can cause an English learner to make it extremely difficult to acquire another language. However, social and emotional learning (SEL) is effective in supporting ELL students. Integrating (SEL) with academic learning has several benefits, including fewer instances of bullying and higher graduation rates.

Continue reading